Diabetes in Dogs – Detecting it Early for your Pekingese

 


Diabetes in Dogs – Detecting it Early for your Pekingese

There is no known cure for diabetes in dogs as well as in humans. However, the earlier it is detected, the more effective the course of treatment will be. Canine diabetes is quite a common illness in dogs. The average age it would appear is around 6-9 years. Diabetes is the result of defective production of insulin by the pancreas. Insulin is the one who is responsible in controlling the body’s sugar level in the blood, thus if minimal insulin is produced then there would be excess of sugar in the blood. This would then lead to dehydration thus the urge to drink massive amounts of water. There are also other dogs who end up getting this disease from their parents since it is a hereditary illness. Bigger and older dogs are more prone to this disease.

This disease is already considered by mainstream medicine experts as an incurable illness that requires a lifetime insulin injection. However, once a healthy diet is implemented, most symptoms would eventually clear up, including poor blood glucose levels.

This disease is already considered by mainstream medicine experts as an incurable illness that requires a lifetime insulin injection. However, once a healthy diet is implemented, most symptoms would eventually clear up, including poor blood glucose levels.

Canine Diabetes Facts

  • Female dogs are twice as likely to get this disease than its male counterpart.
  • Bigger dog breeds are more prone compared to the smaller ones.
  • Age onset: 7-9 years
  • It may begin with obesity but this is not always the case; it can be genetic with other breeds.

Diabetes Signs and Symptoms:

  • Excessive urination
  • Excessive drinking
  • Weight loss
  • Sudden blindness
  • Lethargy

Diabetes in Dogs

An affected dog will be hungry a lot of the time, since glucose is not making it to the brain; glucose levels in the brain are too low for the brain to register that it is receiving food. Because insulin is not giving the muscles and organs the signal to convert glucose to energy, the excess glucose in the blood will be carried out of the body in urine instead of being used for energy, and there will be a concurrent lack of energy. There is also increased thirst as a result of the increase in urine. The liver is adversely affected by this condition, as are the eyes and kidneys.

Source: Pet MD, http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/endocrine/c_dg_diabetes_mellitus_wo_complication#.UKCv2YeTw3m

Why Commercial Dog Food is not Healthy

  • In most cases, commercial dog food has poor meat quality, usually MBM’s (meat-by-products) from a plant or other unlikely sources. Thus, the protein that your pet needs is not being achieved here. The mineral chromium is important in regulating the blood sugar levels; lack of chromium not only leads to diabetes but it can also result to depression and nervousness. Highly processed foods have low chromium content since it is abundant in raw muscle meat, lover and other organic products.
  • To add to the poor meat quality as a base, a very cheap filler is also added. This would depend on what is inexpensive on the world market the time it was produced. If sugar was the cheapest one, then they would add it up. However, it is most commonly carbohydrate (i.e. rice, grains). And the end product of carbohydrates after it undergoes digestion is glucose. Not good.
  • In order for your pet to digest his food properly, and regulate insulin effectively, enzymes are required. Enzymes can’t be seen in any dog food since it can only be found in RAW foods.
  • The presence of toxic chemicals  Most highly toxic chemicals that are banned for human consumption are then added to the commercial dog food. Synthetic nutrients, flavors, coloring,  enhancers and preservatives included. And these things don’t encourage a healthy dog no matter what angle you look at it.

Once you have corrected his diet, then diabetes in dogs won’t be an issue for you not unless he got it genetically. Just watch out for the signs and symptoms and immediately contact your vet in order to take the appropriate actions in order to restore your dog’s health. Promoting a healthy diet is a challenge but it sure is worthy in the long run for the both of you.

Have you dealt with canine diabetes? How did you handle it and how did it turn out? Share with us your story and don’t forget to also share this page to your friends who may need the information.

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