Pekingese Diseases: Be informed about them

 


Pekingese Diseases – Be informed about them

There are actually a number of hereditary pekingese diseases that every owner should be aware of. The ancient Chinese, elite Pekingese is very loyal to its family, no doubt about that. However, it is very independent and not very affectionate, maybe around 2/5 scale. he is very playful when around the family members, but once a stranger comes into the picture, he is a bit aloof and not that sociable.

The Pekingese breed is highly susceptible to respiratory ailments and colds. Their eyes are very sensitive since they have poor developed sockets plus oversized eyelid opening. As an owner, be vigilant for corneal ulcers and clean the eye area using a cottonswap and lukewarm water on a regular basis. Due to its small size, they are also deemed as the best dog for indoor living.

Pekingese Diseases

Joint Problems
The Pekingese is among the many dog breeds prone to a disorder known as luxating patella. Luxating patella is often a term that describes the spontaneous dislocation in the knee cap and is very painful for any dog. Signs that a dog can be suffering from luxating patella incorporate limping, inability to straighten one or both in the hind legs, or the dog’s refusal on bearing weight on the afflicted lower-leg.

Seizures Problems
Cause: Most situations of Pekingese seizures involve epilepsy. They’re just prone to this disease, nonetheless under most circumstances, it seriously isn’t fatal and can be manipulated with medicine and care. More-severe factors behind seizures in Pekingese dogs is a liver shunt, which is any hereditary disease, or injury. Compact dogs, and especially ones with long backs much like the Pekingese, should not jump on home furniture or from other heights avoiding injuring the spine, which should bring on seizures created by compression in the spine. Symptoms: Seizures get their name because the way they look. The muscle groups seize up. Your dog will go stiff and fall into the ground. Its eyes will visit blank and glaze over. It has the muscles may twitch and spasm, and the eyes may roll between the two and the lips may snuggle. It is not doing any of this in response to any government; it is just its muscle groups seizing up. Seizures come in lots of levels of severity. Other titles for seizures are convulsions in addition to fits. The main characterization of a seizure and also the stiffening muscles is the disconnection in the dog from its surroundings. Therapy: Possible cures for Pekingese dog seizures depends on the reason for the problem. Epilepsy has absolutely no cure, but is highly controllable for any lifetime of the dog. Liver shunt problems manifest very early in a puppy’s life and they are very severe. There are surgical treatments available, but the fact the fact that shunts are deep inside that liver makes them difficult to view and correct. Injuries that cause seizures usually involve the central nerve fibres, making them touchy to manage, but professional chiropractic massage and acupuncture assist in alleviate the pressures. In extreme cases, surgery is a choice.

Source: Dogs Info, http://www.dogs-info.net/html/Health/2011/0306/Pekingese-Common-Diseases.html

Other disorders of a Pekingese may include:

  • Cryptorchidism – the condition where one or both testicles won’t descend into the scrotal sac.
  • VHD (Chronic Valvular Heart Disease) – it is the degeneration and thickening of the heart valves.
  • Urolithiasis – formation of bladder stones.
  • Entropion – an issue of the eyelid which causes inward rolling. The hair on the edge of the eyelid may irritate the eyeball which then leads to a more serious condition.
  • KCS (Keratoconjunctivitis sicca) – decrease of tear production.
  • Cataracts – loss of the normal transparency of the yes. This problem often lead to blindness.
  • Atlantoaxial subluxation – a condition where the first 2 neck vertebrae are not attached firmly. Dogs are born with not ligament support to their atlantoaxial joint.
  • Interdigital dermatitis – aka pododermatitis; this is the inflammation of the paws (feet and nails included).
  • Distichiasis – a condition where an extra growth of eyelashes from the upper and lower eyelid occurs.
  • Hydrocephalus – a neurological ailment where there is excessive accumulation of CSF fluid in the ventricular system of the brain.
  • Congenital elbow luxation – dislocated elbow joint.

Furthermore, the Pekingese is also subjected to dwarfism, sertoli cell tumors, facial fold dermatitis and difficulty in delivering puppies.

Basically, that is all of the common pekingese diseases there is to know. Not all dogs are born the same way, so your Pekingese may be healthier and won’t suffer from the aforementioned illnesses compared to the others. I firmly believe that the biggest factor here is the owner’s dedication to his/her Pekingese. If you are able to take good care of your Pekingese, then chances are you both will live a long and happy life together.

If you think that I missed something here, feel free to supply and inform us all too by leaving a message below.

Share

&nsbp;

Get Your FREE e-book:

“Caring for a Pekingese"

Pekingese Breathing Problems

Pekingese breathing problems are primarily due to its wider head and flattened nose. Their abnormal facial construction contributes on why they are such a brachecephalic breed. However, it was also noted that a Pekingese’s breathing issue may be due to their lack of tolerance in physical endurance.

Pekingese is one of the toy breeds that has normal issues with breathing and eye sight. So, if you are a first time owner of this breed you better first know about the breed’s breathing concerns.

Various breeds have different body and facial structures and the Pekes have a very unique facial structure. Their flattened face causes them to have a difficulty in breathing and intolerant to physical endurance.

Pekingese Breathing Problems

Pekingese Breathing Problems

Does the Pekingese have problems with breathing?

Pekingese dogs have small skulls and flat faces that can cause some problems with breathing. These problems can be made worse by long exposure to extremely warm or cold weather. Owners should always watch for signs of trouble with breathing and the common “cold.” In addition, the Pekingese usually does not have a problem with “weeping” eyes. Any sign of this should be shown to a veterinarian right away.

Source: My Dog Breed, http://www.mydogbreed.com/pekingese/pekingese-faq.php

Other Health Concerns You Should Know:

  • Body temperature regulation. Pekes have major issues on this one, one of the factors is their thick coats. But according to experts, this health concern stems out from their breathing problems.
  • Heat Stroke. This breed is very prone to this condition due to their poor temperature regulation. Every owner must be vigilant of this one since it can cause irreversible brain damage or even death at worse cases. Heat strokes often occur when you tend to leave your Pekes outdoors during hot weather for long periods of time. Some signs of heat stroke would include fatigue, nausea, and overall weakness, disorientation, breathing problems, and hypertension. The final result of all this is seizures which is then followed by death.
  • Heart Attack/Stroke. Due to their inability to regulate body temperature effectively, they are prone to stroke and heart attacks. If you see them panting so hard and gasping for air, you better attend to him immediately. Do your best to lower your pet’s temperature. Or bring him to the nearest vet if needed.
  • Another concern is surgery. At one point or another you would need to let your Pekingese go under the knife and by doing so, it requires anesthesia. The administration of anesthesia can cause breathing issues for your Peke. Some Pekes even die during surgery due to anesthesia complications. It is ideal that you should inquire from your vet about this one before allowing any form of surgery on your pet.

Before you decide to go get yourself a Pekingese, make sure that you know all about pekingese breathing problems. Or should I say, you should first research about all the aspects of care for this breed.

Any suggestion or comment for this post? Did you like it? Feel free to leave your words of wisdom behind.

Share

&nsbp;

Get Your FREE e-book:

“Caring for a Pekingese"

Pekingese Health Problems

There are lots of pekingese health problems that an owner should be aware of.  A healthy Peke can live up to 15 years, though it is quite common for them to last 10-12 years these days. This toy breed has a high tedency on eye concerns and breathing issues, according to the experienced breeders, handlers and owners. This kind of dog has a very tiny skull plus a flattened face that all contribute to such illnesses. A new handler or owner should be aware of all the health possibilities right off the bat.

Ulcers on the eye may occur almost instantaneously. There are actually several types of eye ulcers, including the ones that are caused by infections and trauma. Such cases can be treated immediately to prevent further damage. Go to your veterinarian the soonest time possible when you suspect that your pekingese has an eye problem. Then we have refractory ulcer that has a very poor healing process. This happens during your dog’s middle-age or older.

Other common health concerns regarding the Pekingese breed are: skin allergies food allergies, and back problems. While not all dogs will experience this, it is necessary for the owner to be aware of them since the treatment can be quite costly. The Pekes tend to require more Vet care as they grow older.

In general, pekingeses are healthy and hearty little bundle of joy.

Pekingese Health Problems

Pekingese Health Problems

Pekingese dogs are certainly endearing in their size and appearance. Who can resist the charmingly squished face of a little Pekingese? But the majority of their innate health problems exist because they were engineered for their aesthetic qualities without great consideration having been given to how their physiology would be affected.

The result is a darling little creature with a multitude of health concerns that are not necessarily present in other breeds. These range from daily nuisances to possibly life-threatening conditions, which make owning a Pekingese somewhat the doctor’s task. In fact many of the activities they’re naturally inclined to do as dogs will need human aid and supervision because they are so prone to injury and medical issues.

Source: Pekingese Dogs, http://www.pekingese-dogs.net/pekingese-information/health-problems

If I were to buy a Pekingese, I would be most concerned about:

  • His compromised respiratory system. So, never ever smoke near him, keep him away from allergenic pollen and freshly cut grass, and also keep him away from home cleaning products.
  • Heat Stroke. During humid or hot climate, lessen his exposure outside and keep him in an air-conditioned environment. Short-faced dogs has a higher risk of heat stroke since they cannot pant vigorously in order to lower their body temperature.
  • Use a body leash instead of a collar. A collar puts more pressure on his throat thus making it harder for him to breath.
  • Anesthetics. See to it that your vet would use modern anesthetics for him (like isoflurane) and always ask for a BP and heart monitor when in surgery.
  • After care. Wash and dry the folds of skin on his face every after meal time.
  • Slobbering. There are Pekes who have loose jowls, they slabber when drinking.
  • Heavy shedding. Pekes shed a lot! You will be finding hair all over your clothings, furniture, carpets, etc… Be sure you are ready for this one.
  • Grooming. They require a lot of brushing and grooming, otherwise they become a matted mess.

These are the common Pekingese health issues that you will encounter when you own one.  Be sure that you are ready to handle all of it and even go an extra mile just for your Peke before you go and buy or adopt one for yourself.  Think twice before you act on impulse.

I hope this post was helpful to you, guys. Feel free to share this post and leave comments below.

Share

&nsbp;

Get Your FREE e-book:

“Caring for a Pekingese"

comments_template( '', true );